Scientists create incredible ice cream that won't melt

2017-08-08 08:00:33 GMT2017-08-08 16:00:33(Beijing Time) Agencies
Japanese scientists have come up with a cool solution to stop ice cream melting before you've had time to finish it. The ice cream retains its original shape in 28°C weather and still tastes 'cool'. A strawberry extract stops the oil and water from separating so quickly which means the sweet treat stays frozen - even if you blow a hair dryer at them. These strange-looking deserts were first created by mistake by a pastry chef looking to make use of odd-shaped strawberries. (Photo/Sipachina) Japanese scientists have come up with a cool solution to stop ice cream melting before you've had time to finish it. The ice cream retains its original shape in 28°C weather and still tastes 'cool'. A strawberry extract stops the oil and water from separating so quickly which means the sweet treat stays frozen - even if you blow a hair dryer at them. These strange-looking deserts were first created by mistake by a pastry chef looking to make use of odd-shaped strawberries. (Photo/Sipachina)
Japanese scientists have come up with a cool solution to stop ice cream melting before you've had time to finish it. The ice cream retains its original shape in 28°C weather and still tastes 'cool'. A strawberry extract stops the oil and water from separating so quickly which means the sweet treat stays frozen - even if you blow a hair dryer at them. These strange-looking deserts were first created by mistake by a pastry chef looking to make use of odd-shaped strawberries. (Photo/Sipachina) Japanese scientists have come up with a cool solution to stop ice cream melting before you've had time to finish it. The ice cream retains its original shape in 28°C weather and still tastes 'cool'. A strawberry extract stops the oil and water from separating so quickly which means the sweet treat stays frozen - even if you blow a hair dryer at them. These strange-looking deserts were first created by mistake by a pastry chef looking to make use of odd-shaped strawberries. (Photo/Sipachina)
Japanese scientists have come up with a cool solution to stop ice cream melting before you've had time to finish it. The ice cream retains its original shape in 28°C weather and still tastes 'cool'. A strawberry extract stops the oil and water from separating so quickly which means the sweet treat stays frozen - even if you blow a hair dryer at them. These strange-looking deserts were first created by mistake by a pastry chef looking to make use of odd-shaped strawberries. (Photo/Sipachina) Japanese scientists have come up with a cool solution to stop ice cream melting before you've had time to finish it. The ice cream retains its original shape in 28°C weather and still tastes 'cool'. A strawberry extract stops the oil and water from separating so quickly which means the sweet treat stays frozen - even if you blow a hair dryer at them. These strange-looking deserts were first created by mistake by a pastry chef looking to make use of odd-shaped strawberries. (Photo/Sipachina)
Japanese scientists have come up with a cool solution to stop ice cream melting before you've had time to finish it. The ice cream retains its original shape in 28°C weather and still tastes 'cool'. A strawberry extract stops the oil and water from separating so quickly which means the sweet treat stays frozen - even if you blow a hair dryer at them. These strange-looking deserts were first created by mistake by a pastry chef looking to make use of odd-shaped strawberries. (Photo/Sipachina) Japanese scientists have come up with a cool solution to stop ice cream melting before you've had time to finish it. The ice cream retains its original shape in 28°C weather and still tastes 'cool'. A strawberry extract stops the oil and water from separating so quickly which means the sweet treat stays frozen - even if you blow a hair dryer at them. These strange-looking deserts were first created by mistake by a pastry chef looking to make use of odd-shaped strawberries. (Photo/Sipachina)
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