Thu, March 12, 2009
China > Mainland

Traditional ghee lamp festival held in Tibet monastery

2009-03-11 15:49:00 GMT2009-03-11 23:49:00 (Beijing Time)  Xinhua English

A Lama adds ghee to the lamp in front of the figures of Buddha in the Jokhang Temple in Lhasa, capital of southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region, Mar. 11, 2009. A celebration for the ghee flowers and lanterns festival was held in the Jokhang Temple, attracting the visitors from all over the country. (Xinhua/Chogo)

Lamas gather in the Chanbaling Temple in Qamdo, southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region, Mar. 11, 2009. An annual celebration for the ghee flowers and lanterns festival was held in the Chanbaling Temple on Wednesday, to pray for peace and happiness in the new year. (Xinhua/Pubu Zhaxi)

A Lama carries a ghee figure of Buddha in the Chanbaling Temple in Qamdo, southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region, Mar. 11, 2009. An annual celebration for the ghee flowers and lanterns festival was held in the Chanbaling Temple on Wednesday, to pray for peace and happiness in the new year. (Xinhua/Pubu Zhaxi)

A Lama embellishes ghee flowers in the Chanbaling Temple in Qamdo, southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region, Mar. 11, 2009. An annual celebration for the ghee flowers and lanterns festival was held in the Chanbaling Temple on Wednesday, to pray for peace and happiness in the new year. (Xinhua/Pubu Zhaxi)

A believer adds ghee to the lamp in the Jokhang Temple in Lhasa, capital of southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region, Mar. 11, 2009. A celebration for the ghee flowers and lanterns festival was held in the Jokhang Temple, attracting the visitors from all over the nation. (Xinhua/Chogo)

QAMDO, Tibet, March 11 (Xinhua) -- Thousands of Tibetan Buddhists celebrated their traditional ghee lamp festival wishing for good luck and happiness Wednesday at a major monastery in Tibet.

Lamas of the Champa Ling Monastery in Qamdo Prefecture and residents nearby ignited ghee flower lamps in hope of good luck. Farmers and herders came to the monastery to present hada, a silk piece of cloth used for greetings, and pay tributes. They then danced and sang together.

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