Thu, February 18, 2010
China > Mainland > Spring Festival travel peak 2010

Chinese cities brace for massive Spring Festival return travels

2010-02-18 11:54:10 GMT2010-02-18 19:54:10 (Beijing Time)  Xinhua English

Some passengers stand while others sit in a carriage of a train going from Dandong to Shenyang in northeast China's Liaoning Province, on Feb. 18, 2010. Coach and railway terminals in major Chinese cities are bracing for a fresh travel rush, as millions of festival travelers set foot on return trips to city work after the week-long Spring Festival holiday. (Xinhua/Jiang Tieying)

SHANGHAI, Feb. 18 (Xinhua) -- Coach and railway terminals in major Chinese cities are bracing for a fresh travel rush, as millions of festival travelers set foot on return trips to city work after a week-long holiday.

The Shanghai Bureau of Railways reported a daily transport volume of 750,000 passengers on Wednesday. The number was 70,000 more than that on Tuesday. The bureau said the travel peak would take place on Friday, the last day of the seven-day Spring Festival holiday.

Service boothes for migrant workers were set up at Beijing's railway and coach terminals on Wednesday, as the city's human resources management authority launched its annual monitoring on the flow of migrant workers to the city.

Zhang Xiaolin, an official with the Beijing Human Resources and Social Security Bureau, said the service boothes are set up at the transport hubs when the post-holiday travel rush begins every year. The work started five days earlier this year than the previous years.

He said the bureau has set up 25 such service boothes at major terminals, which will collect 24,200 sample questionnaires on migrant workers from Feb. 17 to March 10.

"The questionnaires can help us get information such as the labor source regions and job orientations. Our staff also provide work consultation services at the boothes," said Zhang.

He said Beijing has a huge demand for workers in 10 varieties of jobs, including security guards, waitresses, dustmen, salesmen, hotel waiters and electric appliance maintenance workers.

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