Former Wukan Party chief relieved of provincial delegate

2013-01-22 01:29:03 GMT2013-01-22 09:29:03(Beijing Time)  SINA English

By Yu Runze, Sina English

Xue Chang, former Party branch secretary of Wukan, was relieved of duties as delegate of the Eleventh Guangdong People's Congress due to alleged crimes, according to a decision made by the thirty-ninth meeting of the Eleventh Guangdong People's Congress Standing Committee on Monday.

The meeting also announced that Chen Hongping and Tan Yi were relieved of duties as delegates of the Eleventh Guangdong People's Congress for suspected disciplinary violations and suspected economic problems respectively.

Wukan grabbed international headlines last year when the small village's residents staged three waves of large-scale rallies in four months to protest against village officials' illegal land grabs, corruption and violations of financing and election rules.

Southern China protestors'complaints valid: investigators

Residents of Wukan village had legitimate complaints against officials over wrongdoing concerning land use and financial management, provincial investigators said Friday.

In terms of land use, the provincial investigators of Guangdong province found that Lufeng Fengtian livestock company used more land than was officially approved, said investigator Yang Junbo, who is also deputy chief of the provincial Land and Resources Department.

And Guangdong Yidazhou Group was in arrears with its land compensation to village residents, Yang said.

Xue Chang, former secretary of the village party committee of the Communist Party of China, embezzled money to buy a vehicle for personal use, said investigator Gu Xingwei, who is also deputy chief of the provincial Agriculture Department.

Starting in September, complaints about land use, financing and the village election escalated to violent demonstrations by Wukan residents in the city of Lufeng, which administers Wukan.

Provincial authorities began to look into the protestors' complaints on Dec. 20, and an investigation remains under way.

On Wednesday, investigators announced that the village heads election in February was invalid after finding several violations, and another election would be organized soon.

Earlier this month, local police sealed off the village exits to stop protestors whose anger was reignited by the sudden death of a village representative who was in police custody.

The powder keg was not defused until last Thursday when Zhu Mingguo, vice secretary of the Guangdong provincial committee of the Communist Party of China, held a direct dialogue with villagers, admitted that the protestors' main requests were reasonable and promised a "fair and open" investigation into the grievances.

South China village establishes new party branch after massive protests

Wukan village, which experienced months of large-scale villager protests against local authorities in late 2011, on Sunday set up a new party branch and a work team to prepare for the upcoming re-election of the village committee, according to officials with a provincial work team in charge of the aftermath of the protests.

The new Wukan village branch of the Communist Party of China was expected to organize an impartial election of a village committee that can represent the interests of villagers and help the timely handling of their reasonable appeals, according to the officials.

Starting in September, complaints about land use, financing and the village election in Wukan, Donghai Township in southern Guangdong Province escalated to violent demonstrations by Wukan residents.

The party committee of Donghai Township appointed villager Lin Zulian as secretary of the new village party committee, said the officials, adding that Lin would also lead the preparation work of the re-election of the village committee.

The former village party branch dismissed and the former party chief of Wukan was being investigated, according to the officials.

Provincial authorities in Guangdong began to look into the protestors' complaints on Dec. 20, and an investigation remains underway.

Investigators announced that the protestors had legitimate complaints against officials over wrongdoing concerning land use and financial management. Also, they said that the village head election in February 2011 was invalid after finding several violations, and that another election would be organized soon.

Only with a re-elected village committee, can villagers' appeals be solved, said Wang Yemin, head of the provincial-level investigation team.

The protestors' wrath was defused in late December after Zhu Mingguo, vice secretary of the Guangdong provincial committee of the Communist Party of China, held a direct dialogue with villagers and promised a "fair and open" investigation into the grievances.

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Editor: Yu Runze
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