Yunnan deputy Party chief probed for graft

2015-03-16 01:30:07 GMT2015-03-16 09:30:07(Beijing Time)  Global Times
Qiu He attended the plenary of Yunnan delegate in Beijing during the “two sessions” on Saturday, March 14, one day before he was put under investigation. Qiu He attended the plenary of Yunnan delegate in Beijing during the “two sessions” on Saturday, March 14, one day before he was put under investigation.
Qiu He attended the plenary of Yunnan delegate in Beijing during the “two sessions” on Saturday, March 14, one day before he was put under investigation. Qiu He attended the plenary of Yunnan delegate in Beijing during the “two sessions” on Saturday, March 14, one day before he was put under investigation.
Photo shows Qiu He, deputy Party chief of Yunnan Province and president of Yunnan Communist Party School, attended a meeting of the Yunnan delegate for National People’s Congress in Beijing on March, 3, 2015. Photo shows Qiu He, deputy Party chief of Yunnan Province and president of Yunnan Communist Party School, attended a meeting of the Yunnan delegate for National People’s Congress in Beijing on March, 3, 2015.
Photo shows Qiu He (R) talked with Li Jiheng, Party Chief of Yunnan province in Beijing on March 9, 2014. Photo shows Qiu He (R) talked with Li Jiheng, Party Chief of Yunnan province in Beijing on March 9, 2014.
Qiu He attended the “World’s Walking Day” event in November, 2011 with residents of Kunming, capital city of Yunnan province. Qiu He attended the “World’s Walking Day” event in November, 2011 with residents of Kunming, capital city of Yunnan province.

Ability and past achievements not excuses for corruption: expert

Qiu He, deputy Party chief of Yunnan Province, known for being a hard-line leader, has been put under investigation for serious disciplinary violations, China's top anti-graft body announced Sunday.

Qiu is known as a controversial figure who has led a number of ambitious reforms during his tenure in Yunnan and Jiangsu provinces.

Observers believe Qiu's case has reflected that officials with "too much power" may become prone to corruption, and that officials with great achievements are by no means exempt from the anti-graft crackdown.

"Strong ability and past achievements are not excuses when they have committed crimes. The central government has shown strong resolve in clearing out corruption among government officials," Xu Xianglin, a professor of the School of Government with Peking University, told the Global Times Sunday. Qiu, 58, is being probed for alleged serious violations of Party disciplines and the law, according to a statement published on the website of the Communist Party of China Central Commission for Discipline Inspection. He became the eighth official at the provincial level or above to be investigated this year.

Qiu is also a deputy to the National People's Congress. A day ahead of the announcement of his investigation, Qiu attended a meeting of the Yunnan delegation during the top legislature's annual session in Beijing to discuss the government's annual work report, the Yunnan Daily reported.

Qiu was the Party chief of Kunming, Yunnan's provincial capital, from 2007 to 2011. Before that, he served as the Party chief of Suqian, Jiangsu Province from 2001 to 2006.

Qiu has been investigated for alleged corruption connected to Kunming's urban reconstruction plan, according to news portal caixin.com.

 

 

Qiu's predecessor Zhang Tianxin, who served as Party chief of Kunming from 2011 to 2014, was put under investigation in July 2014.

"As the anti-corruption drive deepens, there will be more cases with groups of corrupt officials being exposed," Xu said.

During his tenure in Jiangsu, Qiu launched a series of ambitious policies including mass forestation to improve environment quality, land reform and market economy overhauls.

He reportedly also ordered officials to learn at least 300 phrases in English and 100 in Vietnamese to ease communications with Yunnan's neighboring country.

The probe of Qiu at the conclusion of the two sessions has broken an unwritten rule that senior corrupt officials would generally not be probed during major meetings, proving again that there are no "patterns" or exemptions in the anti-graft crackdown, the People's Daily posted on its WeChat account.

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