Tue, October 07, 2008
China > Mainland

Supplies sent to Tibetan villages hit by quake

2008-10-07 04:16:44 GMT2008-10-07 12:16:44 (Beijing Time) Xinhua English

Injured residents are transferred to ambulance at Yangyi Village, the epicenter of the earthquake, in Gedar Township of Damxung County in southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region, in the early morning of Oct. 7, 2008. (Xinhua Photo/Purbu Zhaxi)

A rescuer delivers food to local residents at Yangyi Village, the epicenter of the earthquake, in Gedar Township of Damxung County in southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region, on Oct. 7, 2008. (Xinhua Photo/Purbu Zhaxi)

A woman with her child walks past collapsed buildings in Gedar Township of Damxung County in southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region, Oct. 6, 2008. (Xinhua Photo/Purbu Zhaxi)

Rescuers deliver food to local residents at Yangyi Village, the epicenter of the earthquake, in Gedar Township of Damxung County in southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region, on Oct. 7, 2008. (Xinhua Photo/Purbu Zhaxi)

DAMXUNG, Tibet, Oct. 7 (Xinhua) -- Tents, food and water are now being trucked in to Tibetan villages hit by a 6.6-magnitude earthquake after rescuers were able to open a main road Tuesday.

In Gedar, a town with more than 4,000 people in Damxung County, nearly every house had cracked walls after the quake hit at 4:30 p.m. on Monday.

It's epicenter was near Tibet's regional capital Lhasa.

Yangyi Village was hardest hit by the quake. Nine people died, 19 were injured and 127 homes toppled.

Another 20 residential houses were destroyed in neighboring Nyemo County but no casualties were reported.

Shortly after the road to Yangyi Village was restored around midnight, injured villagers were sent to a hospital for treatment.

"Most of them suffer traumas or bone fractures," said Tashi Namgyal, president of the People's Hospital, the leading hospital in Lhasa.

The hospital had sent six medical workers to the village.

Most quake victims were women, children and elderly people, while men were away mowing and storing forage grass for the winter, said Tsering Samdrup, a Yangyi villager.

Fearing their homes would collapse, most families stayed out intents for the night amid continuous after shocks. Some wept over the dead.

"I can't believe it," cried Nyima, a Tibetan herder who lost her two-year-old daughter.

At least 700 rescuers are working at the site.

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