Wed, January 21, 2009
China > Mainland > 2009 Spring Festival

Chinese "Little New Year" festival celebrated

2009-01-19 01:14:37 GMT2009-01-19 09:14:37 (Beijing Time)  Xinhua English

Tourists visit the bustling snack street of Wangfujing Street in Beijing, capital of China, Jan. 18, 2009, the traditional Chinese "Little New Year" festival, a week before "New Year," or Spring Festival. The 23rd day of the 12th lunar month is called "xiao nian" in Chinese, which literally means "Little New Year." Traditionally it is an important occasion when people offer sacrifices to the "Kitchen God" who looks after the family's fortunes. (Xinhua/Fan Jiashan)

A foreign tourist tries playing Jin Opera that is popular in north China's Shanxi Province in Pingyao, Shanxi, Jan. 17, 2009. The time-honoured Pingyao city listed among the UNESCO World Cultural Heritages prepares for the approaching Spring Festival with traditional celebrations. (Xinhua/Yan Yan)

Local citizens walk along a street decorated with lanterns in Pingyao, north China's Shanxi Province, Jan. 17, 2009. The time-honoured Pingyao city listed among the UNESCO World Cultural Heritages prepares for the approaching Spring Festival with traditional celebrations. (Xinhua/Yan Yan)

Local citizens walk along the street decorated with lanterns in Pingyao, north China's Shanxi Province, Jan. 17, 2009. The time-honoured Pingyao city listed among the UNESCO World Cultural Heritages prepares for the approaching Spring Festival with traditional celebrations. (Xinhua/Yan Yan)

A folk artist performs paper-cutting in Pingyao, north China's Shanxi Province, Jan. 17, 2009. The time-honoured Pingyao city listed among the UNESCO World Cultural Heritages prepares for the approaching Spring Festival with traditional celebrations. (Xinhua/Yan Yan)

The traditional Chinese "Little New Year" festival was celebrated Jan. 18, 2009, a week before Chinese New Year, or Spring Festival.

The 23rd day of the 12th lunar month is called "xiao nian" in Chinese, which literally means "Little New Year."

Traditionally it is an important occasion when people offer sacrifices to the "Kitchen God" who looks after the family's fortunes.

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