Tue, March 03, 2009
China > Mainland

50 years of development in Tibet

2009-03-03 06:54:11 GMT2009-03-03 14:54:11 (Beijing Time)  Xinhua English

Representatives of the Tibetan ethnic group vote during an election in southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region, Jan. 20, 2008. Under the Chinese laws, the people of Tibet can directly elect deputies to grassroots-level people's congress, China's legislative body, who in turn elect deputies to provincial and national people's congresses, according to the white paper titled "Fifty Years of Democratic Reform in Tibet" released on March 2, 2009 by the Information Office of the State Council, or China's Cabinet. (Xinhua/Chogo)

Two women pose for photos in front of the Potala Palace in Lhasa, capital of southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region, Feb. 11, 2008. Tibet Autonomous Region is in its best period of development after 50 years of economic development and social progress under the leadership of the Communist Party of China, according to the white paper titled "Fifty Years of Democratic Reform in Tibet" released on March 2, 2009 by the Information Office of the State Council, or China's Cabinet. (Xinhua/Chogo)

A farmer is happy with the good harvest of watermelon in Xigaze, southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region, June 15, 2007. (Xinhua/Chogo)

Farmer Gesang of the Tibetan ethnic group harvests wheat in Caigongtang Township of Lhasa, capital of southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region, Aug. 23, 2008. Tibet has seen its GDP soar from 174 million RMB yuan (25.44 million U.S. dollars) in 1959 to 39.591 billion yuan (5.79 billion dollars) in 2008, with an annual growth rate of 8.9 percent on the average, according to the white paper titled "Fifty Years of Democratic Reform in Tibet" released on March 2, 2009 by the Information Office of the State Council, or China's Cabinet. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

Dainzin of the Tibetan ethnic group attends class of the Tibetan language at No. 1 Primary School in Lhasa, capital of southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region, in this undated photo. During the past 50 years, China's central government has invested a huge amount of funds in education in Tibet, making Tibet the first place in China to enjoy free compulsory education in both urban and rural areas. Since 1985, the state has set up boarding primary and high schools in farming and pastoral areas, and covered all tuition as well as food and lodging expenses for students at the stage of compulsory education from Tibet's farming and pastoral families, according to the white paper titled "Fifty Years of Democratic Reform in Tibet" released on March 2, 2009 by the Information Office of the State Council, or China's Cabinet. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

China's government Monday published a white paper on the situation in Tibet before and since1959 to mark the 50th anniversary of the region's Democratic Reform.

The paper, released by the State Council Information Office, reviewed the profound changes that have taken place in the past 50years.

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