Thu, March 12, 2009
China > China & World

Chinese, U.S. top diplomats hold talks

2009-03-12 05:25:38 GMT2009-03-12 13:25:38 (Beijing Time)  Xinhua English

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (R) shakes hands with visiting Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi in Washington, U.S., March 11, 2009. Yang Jiechi and Hillary Clinton held formal talks here on Wednesday to exchange views on bilateral relations and other issues of mutual concern. (Xinhua/Zhang Yan)

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (R) walks with visiting Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi in Washington, U.S., March 11, 2009. Yang Jiechi and Hillary Clinton held formal talks here on Wednesday to exchange views on bilateral relations and other issues of mutual concern. (Xinhua/Zhang Yan)

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (R) talks with visiting Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi in Washington, U.S., March 11, 2009. Yang Jiechi and Hillary Clinton held formal talks here on Wednesday to exchange views on bilateral relations and other issues of mutual concern. (Xinhua/Zhang Yan)

WASHINGTON, March 11 (Xinhua) -- Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi and his U.S. counterpart Hillary Clinton held talks here Wednesday, exchanging views on bilateral relations and other issues of mutual concerns, including the nuclear issue on the Korean peninsula and the Group of 20 (G20) summit.

The two diplomats reached consensus on a wide range of issues, agreeing to further strengthen dialogues and cooperation and make joint efforts to push bilateral ties forward.

Yang said that the China-U.S. relationship is facing a major opportunity of development at a new starting point and the two countries share extensive interests and shoulder important responsibilities for world peace, stability and development.

The Chinese minister, who is here on a five-day working visit, said both sides should, taking the overall situation into consideration with a long-term perspective, work earnestly to implement the important consensus reached between Chinese President Hu Jintao and U.S. President Barack Obama.

The two sides should promote dialogues, exchanges and cooperation in a wide range of areas in accordance with the principles of mutual respect, seeking common ground while maintaining differences, and win-win cooperation, to push bilateral relations forward in a sound and stable manner, Yang added.

Clinton, who paid a successful visit to China last month, said the United States and China should cultivate a positive and cooperative relationship, which is of vital importance not only to the benefit of both peoples but to the world peace and prosperity as well.

She said the U.S. side is willing to work with the Chinese side to deepen and expand cooperation and keep providing impetus for the growth of bilateral relations.

The minister and the secretary agreed to maintain close contacts at high and other levels.

Both believed that the proposed meeting between President Hu and President Obama at the financial summit scheduled for early April in London is of great significance to China-U.S. ties at a new phase and the two sides should work together to make elaborated preparation to ensure the success of the meeting.

Yang and Clinton agreed that the two countries will make joint efforts to ensure a positive outcome from the summit scheduled for early April in London designed to tackle the current global financial and economic downturn.

Yang and Clinton believed that efforts to combat the financial crisis should be a major area of cooperation between the two countries in the future.

They agreed that both sides should continue to strengthen dialogue and coordination on macro-economic policies. They also agreed to work together to oppose protectionism in various forms, deepen cooperation in economy, trade and investment, play their due roles in stabilizing the international financial situation, and promoting reform of the international financial system and institutions in a bid to facilitate an early recovery of the world economy.

Yang, during the talks, urged the U.S. side to stop meddling in China's internal affairs through the Tibet issue.

He reaffirmed the principled position of the Chinese government on Tibet-related issues, expressing the Chinese side's resolute opposition and strong indignation over some recent statements made by the U.S. administration and over the adoption on Wednesday by the U.S. House of Representatives of a resolution on Tibet introduced by a handful of anti-China U.S. congressmen.

The minister stressed that the Tibet issue is vital to China's sovereignty and territorial integrity, urging the U.S. side to respect China's position and concerns on the issue and take effective steps to clear up any negative ramifications of the wrong words and deeds by the U.S. side.

As to the Taiwan issue, Yang briefed Clinton of the recent developments in cross-Straits relations.

He reiterated China's principled position on the issue and expressed hope that the U.S. side will keep its relevant promises, handle the issue properly and with caution, and support the peaceful development of cross-Straits relations with concrete actions.

Clinton, for her part, said that the U.S. side firmly supports the one-China policy. She welcomed and expressed support for the peaceful development of cross-Straits relations.

Add Your Comments:

Your Name:
Your Country:
Comment:
(English Only)
 
Please read our Terms of Service. Messages that harass, abuse or threaten others; have obscene or otherwise objectionable content; have spam, commercial or advertising content or links may be removed.

SPECIAL COVERAGE

MOST VIEWED

LATEST VIDEO

PICTURE GALLERY