Fri, October 12, 2012
Lifestyle > Culture

Li Changchun sends congratulation letter to Mo Yan

2012-10-12 03:46:00 GMT2012-10-12 11:46:00(Beijing Time)  SINA.com

"I am very surprised to be awarded the prize," Mo told reporters hours after his win in his hometown, in Gaomi City of east China's Shandong Province.

Li Changchun sends congratulation letter to Mo Yan

Li Changchun, China’s publicity chief, and member of the Politburo Standing Committee of the Communist Party of China (CPC), sent a congratulation letter to Chinese Writers’ Association, where the 2012 Nobel literature Laureate Mo Yan serves as the vice chairman.

The letter says:  Mo Yan carrying off the Nobel Prize for Literature is not only a showcase of prosperity and progress of the Chinese literature, but also a reflection of the ceaseless rise in China’s comprehensive national strength and international influence.

In the letter, he hopes the Chinese writers will adhere to the people-oriented guidance in their creative work so as to produce more outstanding works.

FM spokesman congratulates Mo Yan on Nobel literature prize

A Foreign Ministry spokesman on Friday expressed congratulations to author Mo Yan on his receipt of the 2012 Nobel Prize in Literature.

Mo Yan is also the recent winner of the Mao Dun Literature Prize, China's most prestigious award for novels, which reflects his outstanding literary attainments, spokesman Hong Lei said at a regular press briefing.

The long history and splendid culture of China are the common treasure of the entire humankind, the spokesman said, adding that China hopes people from around the world will know more about Chinese culture and feel the glamor of outstanding Chinese literature.

When asked why China holds different opinions over Mo Yan’s receipt of the Nobel Prize for Literature compared with the situation two years ago when China criticized Nobel Peace Prize Committee based in Norway interfered with China’s internal affairs, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Hong Lei said that Mo Yan’s accomplishments in literature is obvious to all. Two years ago, Noble Peace Prize Committee decided to interfere with China’s internal affairs and judicial sovereignty. Our opposition then stood to reason.

EU wins Nobel Peace Prize

The Nobel Peace Prize was on Friday awarded to the European Union, an institution today wracked by crisis but that is credited with bringing more than half a century of peace to a continent ripped apart by World War II.

The EU and its predecessors "have over six decades contributed to peace and reconciliation, democracy and human rights," Nobel Committee president Thorbjoern Jagland said in Oslo.

EU Parliament head 'touched, honoured' by Nobel Peace Prize

The head of the European Parliament, German Socialist Martin Schulz, said Friday he felt "deeply touched" and "honoured" at the award of the 2012 Nobel Peace Prize to the European Union.

In a first reaction from one of the three main EU institutions, Schulz said on Twitter: "Deeply touched honoured that the EU has won the Nobel Peace Prize. Reconciliation is what the EU is about. It can serve as inspiration." Full story

Video: Royal Swedish Academy announces the 2012 winner of the Nobel prize for literature in Stockholm

Nobel Laureate Mo Yan: Thanks to all who support and hit me

By Miao Miao, Sina English

Immediately after winning the 2012 Nobel Prize in Literature on October 11, Mo Yan was interviewed the same evening in his hometown Gaomi, East China's Shandong Province, where he stayed with his family. 

“I owe my thanks to my supporters as well as those who criticized me,” said Mo Yan to the reporters. 

On prize: He is not as excited as reporters when touching on the Nobel Prize  

Reporters from his hometown media seemed to be more thrilled than Mo Yan himself about the prize. Mo Yan, as always, looked rather calmed.  

“What matters to a writer is the works rather than the prize, and there is nothing to boast of. 

I need to come back to my writing as soon as possible, “he said. “ But now I have to spent much of time talking to you reporters,” he joked.  

“Winning Nobel Prize is a great impetus to my writing in future. I should keep clear-headed and keep the way I am. ” 

On works: The most important things to a writer are works rather than prize 

Mo “offers a unique insight into a unique world in a quite unique manner,” Peter Englund, head of the Swedish Academy said. His style is "a fountain of words and stories and stories within stories. He's amazing." 

Mo used a mixture of fantasy and reality, historical and social perspectives to create a world which was reminiscent of the writings of William Faulkner and Gabriel Garcia Marquez.  

At the same time, he found a "departure point in old Chinese literature and in oral tradition", the Academy said. 

"I think the reason why I could win the prize is because I set my pen with unique Chinese characteristics, and tell stories from a viewpoint of common human beings, which transcends differences of nation and culture." Mo said. 

"But I do not think that the award represents anything. What matters most for a writer is his works rather than a prize. And I think that China has many outstanding authors, and their great works should also be recognized by the world.” 

Mo Yan’s novels were translated into several languages. He is best known in the West for "Red Sorghum", which portrayed the hardships endured by farmers in early days and was made a film directed by Zhang Yimou.   His epic novel "Big Breasts and Wide Hips," translated by Howard Goldblatt, is first and foremost about women in a country where men dominate.

His recent work "Frog" more directly criticized China's one-child family policy, which helped control the country's population explosion but also brought tragedies to rural residents.

Frog traces the life of a midwife who witnesses forced late-term abortions, forced sterilization and other horrors.

Mo Yan has been fond of reading since childhood and he tried to change the fate through writing, Mo Yan said he would recommend his books: Red Sorghum and Life and Death Are Wearing Me Out, to youngsters.

On hometown: I am indebt to my hometown

Born in 1955 into a rural family, Mo lived for more than 20 years in his hometown Gaomi, East China's Shandong Province. Mo said he draws inspiration from folk art in his hometown, such as clay sculpture, paper cuts, traditional new- year paintings.

"My works are Chinese literature, which is part of world literature. They show the life of Chinese people as well as the country's unique culture and folk custom," Mo told reporters in his hometown. 

On readers: thanks to those who have supported or criticized me  

“No matter what they think of me and my works, they have their reasons. We are living in a society that allows everybody to express his own ideas. I owe my thanks to all of my readers, no matter what they say about me, which is something of a ‘baptism’ to me,” Mo Yan said.

“From the internet, for example, I get to know that people hold different opinions about my works, which is a good chance for me to learn.”   

Mo's prize may give an impetus to the country's writers. With more Chinese writers like Mo, the world could learn more of a real China. Perhaps, this is another reason for the Swedish Academy's choice.

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