New photos of child urinating on street of Hong Kong released: there was excrement, no diaper

2014-04-23 07:32:09 GMT2014-04-23 15:32:09(Beijing Time)  SINA English
The man with the camera said :"I'm a journalist, please give it (memory card) back to me."The man with the camera said :"I'm a journalist, please give it (memory card) back to me."
A man asked the couple if they had witnesses.A man asked the couple if they had witnesses.
The girl's excrement on the floorThe girl's excrement on the floor
The girl's excrement on the floorThe girl's excrement on the floor
The girl's excrement on the floorThe girl's excrement on the floor
The mother cleaned for the girl.The mother cleaned for the girl.

Li Jing

Next Magazine, a Hong Kong magazine, released a video containing new photos of the mainland child relieving herself on the street of Hong Kong this morning. The photos showed excrement on the ground, and there was no diaper as netizens pointed out in yesterday’s disputes.

Yesterday, the video footages about a mainland couple clashed with Hong Kong locals because of their two-year-old daughter urinating on the street caused a stir among Chinese cyber citizens. Some criticized on Weibo that mainland tourists lack the sense of decency, which had caused frequent frictions between Hong Kong natives and mainland visitors in recent years; while others defensed the couple that the pedestrian acted “overdramatic”.

They said the video clips didn’t show the whole thing – the mother was holding a paper diaper beneath the urinating child and the floor wasn’t stained when the child stood up.

Till 2 p.m. today, there have been over 32,000 people voted for blaming mainland tourists’ bad behaviors on Weibo’s poll, and another 186,000 voted for sympathy for the couple and that Hong Kong residents were biased against mainlanders.

The photos were taken by the cameral appeared in the video, showing that there was excrement on the ground, and there was no diaper as netizens pointed out in yesterday’s disputes.

The video footage also showed an interview afterwards of Mr. Ng, the man in dark T-shirt who stopped the couple from leaving in the first video clips. Mr. Ng’s arm and legs were scratched by baby carriage in the quarrel. He was “a bit unhappy” that the netizens speaking him of being overdramatic.

Mr. Ng said he was passing by with his girlfriend the other day on the street when the quarrel broke out. He couldn’t bear watching the couple let their child relieve herself on the street and snatched other people’s camera, so he went over to ease the quarrel.

“Filming a child pooping on the street is a small thing, and you can ask the young man politely to delete the photos, why would you snatch the camera?”

Hong Kong based journalist Lvqiu Luwei commented on her Weibo that “Avoiding expose child’s body in public places is common sense for parents. If you cannot find a bathroom, go to somewhere lonely, not in front of strangers. This is to love your child. And in Hong Kong, you have to abide by the law for everything. Call the police first if you want to protect your rights. ”

Well-known Weibo blogger “Pretend to be in NYC”(假装在纽约) agreed with mainland netizens: “The meaning of civilization not only includes not urinating on the street, but also friendliness and forgiveness. The former is only on the surface level, while the latter is the essence. True civilized citizens should go over and ask the mother if she needed help, or to lead her to another toilet, not to take photos callously as a proof that the mainlanders were ‘uncivilized people’. Mainlanders’ sense of decency needs to be improved indeed, but the civilization of Hong Kong locals needs to be elevated as well.”

The latest news from Hong Kong police station was that the child’s mother didn’t slap anyone on the face.

view new video here:http://v.ifeng.com/vblog/dv/2014004/04684eb4-37aa-49e4-a71e-fa5b5d06e428.shtml

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