Sukkot celebrated in West Bank city of Nablus

2013-10-18 01:29:35 GMT2013-10-18 09:29:35(Beijing Time)  Xinhua English

 

A Samaritan woman hangs fruit to the ceiling of her house ahead of Sukkot, the Feast of the Tabernacles, at Mount Gerizim near the West Bank city of Nablus, Oct. 16, 2013. Samaritans decorate ceiling with fruits in a geometric form to commemorate the exodus of Jews from Egypt more than 3,200 years ago. A Samaritan woman hangs fruit to the ceiling of her house ahead of Sukkot, the Feast of the Tabernacles, at Mount Gerizim near the West Bank city of Nablus, Oct. 16, 2013. Samaritans decorate ceiling with fruits in a geometric form to commemorate the exodus of Jews from Egypt more than 3,200 years ago.
A Samaritan boy hangs fruit to the ceiling of his house ahead of Sukkot, the Feast of the Tabernacles, at Mount Gerizim near the West Bank city of Nablus, Oct. 16, 2013. Samaritans decorate ceiling with fruits in a geometric form to commemorate the exodus of Jews from Egypt more than 3,200 years ago. A Samaritan boy hangs fruit to the ceiling of his house ahead of Sukkot, the Feast of the Tabernacles, at Mount Gerizim near the West Bank city of Nablus, Oct. 16, 2013. Samaritans decorate ceiling with fruits in a geometric form to commemorate the exodus of Jews from Egypt more than 3,200 years ago.

Sukkot is a biblical Jewish holiday celebrated on the 15th day of the month of Tishrei (varies from late September to late October). It is one of the three biblically mandated festivals Shalosh regalim on which Hebrews were commanded to make a pilgrimage to the Temple in Jerusalem.

It follows the solemn holiday of Yom Kippur, or the Day of Atonement.

The holiday lasts seven days (eight in the diaspora). The first day (and second

in the diaspora) is a sabbath-like yom tov (holiday) when work is forbidden, followed by the intermediate Chol Hamoed and Shemini Atzeret.

The Hebrew word sukkōt is the plural of sukkah, "booth or tabernacle", which is a walled structure covered with schach (plant material such as leafy tree overgrowth or palm leaves).

The sukkah is intended as a reminiscence of the type of fragile dwellings in which the Israelites dwelt during their 40 years of travel in the desert after the Exodus from slavery in Egypt.

Throughout the holiday, meals are eaten inside the sukkah and some people sleep there as well. On each day of the holiday, members of the household recite a blessing over the lulav (closed frond of the date palm tree, bound with boughs and branches of the willow and myrtle trees) and etrog (yellow citron).

 

 

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