Fri, February 13, 2009
Lifestyle > Culture

American photographer wins World Press Photo

2009-02-13 13:33:14 GMT2009-02-13 21:33:14 (Beijing Time)  Xinhua English

Photo taken by Zhao Qing for China Youth Daily, based in China, in 2008, shows "Olympics on TV in Beijing". The results of the 52nd annual World Press Photo Contest (WPP) were announced in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Feb. 13, 2009. Zhao's image won the 1st prize of Sports Features Stories category. (Xinhua/WPP/Zhao Qing, China Youth Daily)(Editorial only, Not for sale, No Archives)

Photo taken by Chiba Yasuyoshi for Agence France-Presse, on March 1, 2008, shows "Inter-tribal conflict, Western Kenya". The results of the 52nd annual World Press Photo Contest (WPP) were announced in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Feb. 13, 2009. Chiba Yasuyoshi's image won the 1st prize of People in the News Singles category. (Xinhua/WPP/Chiba Yasuyoshi, Agence France-Presse)(Editorial only, Not for sale, No Archives)

Photo taken by Callie Shell for Aurora Photos for Time, shows "Barack Obama presidential campaign, January-October". The results of the 52nd annual World Press Photo Contest (WPP) were announced in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Feb. 13, 2009. Callie Shell's image won the 1st prize of People in the News Stories category. (Xinhua/WPP/Callie Shell, Aurora Photos for Time)(Editorial only, Not for sale, No Archives)

Photo taken by Vincent Laforet for Newsweek, on August 23, 2008, shows "Divers, Beijing Olympic Games". The results of the 52nd annual World Press Photo Contest (WPP) were announced in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Feb. 13, 2009. Vincent Laforet's image won the 1st prize of Sports Action Stories category. (Xinhua/WPP/Vincent Laforet, Newsweek)(Editorial only, Not for sale, No Archives)

BRUSSELS, Feb. 13 (Xinhua) -- American photographer Anthony Suau has won the top prize at the World Press Photo Contest with his black-and-white picture showing a police officer enforcing a eviction of a house in the United States, the Amsterdam-based contest organizer announced Friday.

His picture, which is part of a story commissioned by Time magazine, shows an armed officer moving through a home in Ohio after the residents left because they couldn't pay their mortgages.

The picture was chosen as World Press Photo of the Year because of its strength in showing the opposites, Jury chair MaryAnne Golon said.

"It looks like a classic conflict photograph, but it is simply the eviction of people from a house following foreclosure. Now war in its classic sense is coming into people's houses because they can't pay their mortgages," Golon said.

Add Your Comments:

Your Name:
Your Country:
Comment:
(English Only)
 
Please read our Terms of Service. Messages that harass, abuse or threaten others; have obscene or otherwise objectionable content; have spam, commercial or advertising content or links may be removed.

SPECIAL COVERAGE

MOST VIEWED

LATEST VIDEO

PICTURE GALLERY