Sat, December 24, 2011
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Sakyamuni tooth sarira returns to China after display in Myanmar

2011-12-24 11:23:14 GMT2011-12-24 19:23:14(Beijing Time)  Xinhua English

Staff members carry the pagoda containing the Sakyamuni tooth sarira, a sacred Buddhist relic, off the chartered plane at Beijing Capital International Airport in Beijing, capital of China, Dec. 24, 2011. The Sakyamuni tooth sarira returned to China on Saturday after concluding its fourth trip to Myanmar for 48-day public obeisance in the country. It was later carried to the Lingguang Temple in Beijing, the relic's permanent residence. During the past 48 days, the relic was worshipped by over 4 million people in Myanmar's Yangon, Nay Pyi Taw and Mandalay. (Xinhua/Li Fangyu)

Staff members carry the pagoda containing the Sakyamuni tooth sarira, a sacred Buddhist relic, off the chartered plane at Beijing Capital International Airport in Beijing, capital of China, Dec. 24, 2011. The Sakyamuni tooth sarira returned to China on Saturday after concluding its fourth trip to Myanmar for 48-day public obeisance in the country. It was later carried to the Lingguang Temple in Beijing, the relic's permanent residence. During the past 48 days, the relic was worshipped by over 4 million people in Myanmar's Yangon, Nay Pyi Taw and Mandalay. (Xinhua/Li Fangyu)

Staff members carry the pagoda containing the Sakyamuni tooth sarira, a sacred Buddhist relic, onto a float at Beijing Capital International Airport in Beijing, capital of China, Dec. 24, 2011. The Sakyamuni tooth sarira returned to China on Saturday after concluding its fourth trip to Myanmar for 48-day public obeisance in the country. It was later carried to the Lingguang Temple in Beijing, the relic's permanent residence. During the past 48 days, the relic was worshipped by over 4 million people in Myanmar's Yangon, Nay Pyi Taw and Mandalay. (Xinhua/Li Fangyu)

The float carrying the pagoda containing the Sakyamuni tooth sarira, a sacred Buddhist relic, prepares to leave for the Lingguang Temple in Beijing, capital of China, Dec. 24, 2011. The Sakyamuni tooth sarira returned to China on Saturday after concluding its fourth trip to Myanmar for 48-day public obeisance in the country. It was later carried to the Lingguang Temple in Beijing, the relic's permanent residence. During the past 48 days, the relic was worshipped by over 4 million people in Myanmar's Yangon, Nay Pyi Taw and Mandalay. (Xinhua/Li Fangyu)

BEIJING, Dec. 24 (Xinhua) -- Sakyamuni tooth sarira, a sacred Buddhist relic, has ended its 48-day display in Myanmar and returned to China Saturday.

The plane carrying the sarira landed safely at around 17:30 Beijing Time in Beijing Capital International Airport, where it was welcomed by Master Chuanyin, president of the Buddhist Association of China and Wang Zuo'an, head of China's State Administration for Religious Affairs.

Sarira was then officially returned to China after Myanmar's Minister of Religious Affairs Thura U Myint Maung and Wang Zuo'an signed an hand-over agreement on a brief ceremony held at the airport.

The sacred relic was then transferred by vehicle to western Beijing's Lingguang Temple, the relic's permanent residence, followed by a religious ceremony to mark its return.

Sarira are remains from the cremation of Buddhas or a saintly monk's body, often in the shape of beads, regarded as the most treasured Buddhist relics.

After Sakyamuni (565-486 BC), the founder of Buddhism, was cremated some 2,500 years ago, a few pieces of his sarira relics were brought to China by monks who were preaching Buddhism.

At the invitation of Myanmar government, the Sarira was brought to the nation's Nay Pyi Taw, Yangon and Mandalay for obeisance since Nov. 6. During the past 48 days, the relic was worshipped by over 4 million people.

It is the fourth time the sacred relic has been taken to Myanmar to be displayed and worshipped. It was previously brought to Myanmar in 1955, 1994 and 1996.

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