Fri, February 27, 2009
Sports > Popular News > 24th Winter Universiade

China wins women's curling title at Harbin Universiade

2009-02-27 05:25:04 GMT2009-02-27 13:25:04 (Beijing Time)  Xinhua English

Players of China compete during the women's curling final against Canada in the 24th World Winter Universiade at Harbin, capital city of northeast China's Heilongjiang Province, Feb. 27, 2009. China won 6-5 and claimed the title of the event. (Xinhua Photo)

Players of China celebrate after winning the women's curling final against Canada in the 24th World Winter Universiade at Harbin, capital city of northeast China's Heilongjiang Province, Feb. 27, 2009. China won 6-5 and claimed the title of the event. (Xinhua Photo)

HARBIN, Northeast China, Feb. 27 (Xinhua) -- China edged over Canada 6-5 to win the women's curling title on Friday, adding the 17th gold for the host at the ongoing Harbin Winter Universiade.

It is the first-ever gold the Chinese women claimed at international all-round sports competitions, also the best-ever achievement they made in world arena.

Cheered on by home fans, China took advantage from the start and upset Canada 4-2 after the first five ends.

Canada trailed closely and claimed back two points in the seventh end, but still lagged behind 5-4 to China.

In the key 10th end, China earned a beautiful three-point end while Canada made fatal mistakes with an invalid shot. The latter conceded with the 6-5 loss to China.

China and Canada breezed into the women's final after whitewashing Russia and Britain on Thursday in the semi-finals, respectively.

The men's final is scheduled on Friday afternoon, with Sweden and Norway competing for the gold of the curling events due to conclude after the games.

Unlike the World Championships, the top four in the round robin draw of the Universiade would breeze into the semi-finals, in which the first against the last and the second against the third for the two seats of the final.

A curling match normally has 10 ends, but a team may concede earlier if it has no chance to come back.

The rock-sliding sport, originated in Scotland more than five hundred years ago, was often referred to the "chess on ice" due to its complex nature of stone placement and shot selection. The game was promoted as an Olympic medal sport in 1998.

Add Your Comments:

Your Name:
Your Country:
Comment:
(English Only)
 
Please read our Terms of Service. Messages that harass, abuse or threaten others; have obscene or otherwise objectionable content; have spam, commercial or advertising content or links may be removed.

SPECIAL COVERAGE

MOST VIEWED

LATEST VIDEO

PICTURE GALLERY