Sat, October 09, 2010
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Scientists find thousands of exotic new species

2010-10-09 02:32:40 GMT2010-10-09 10:32:40 (Beijing Time)  Xinhua English

A hydrothermal vent snail (Alviniconcha sp.) found in Suiyo Seamount, Tokyo Hydrothermal Vent, is seen in this undated handout picture. Scientists completed a 10-year census of marine life on October 4, 2010, after finding thousands of exotic new species in a project that will help assess threats to the oceans ranging from climate change to BP's oil spill. The $650 million international census, by 2,700 experts in 80 nations, discovered creatures such as a hairy-clawed "yeti crab", luminous fish in the sunless depths, a shrimp thought extinct in Jurassic times and a 7-metre (23 ft) long squid. (Photo: geo.sina.com.cn/ Yoshihiro Fujiwara, JAMSTEC)

Scientists completed a 10-year census of marine life on October 4, 2010, after finding thousands of exotic new species in a project that will help assess threats to the oceans ranging from climate change to BP's oil spill. The $650 million international census, by 2,700 experts in 80 nations, discovered creatures such as a hairy-clawed "yeti crab", luminous fish in the sunless depths, a shrimp thought extinct in Jurassic times and a 7-metre (23 ft) long squid. (Photo: geo.sina.com.cn/James Reimer, University of the Ryukyus)

A polychaete worm (vigtorniella sp) found at a whale fall at Sagami Bay, Japan at a depth of 925 meters, is seen in this undated handout. Scientists completed a 10-year census of marine life on October 4, 2010, after finding thousands of exotic new species in a project that will help assess threats to the oceans ranging from climate change to BP's oil spill. The $650 million international census, by 2,700 experts in 80 nations, discovered creatures such as a hairy-clawed "yeti crab", luminous fish in the sunless depths, a shrimp thought extinct in Jurassic times and a 7-metre (23 ft) long squid. (Photo: geo.sina.com.cn)

Scientists completed a 10-year census of marine life on October 4, 2010, after finding thousands of exotic new species in a project that will help assess threats to the oceans ranging from climate change to BP's oil spill. The $650 million international census, by 2,700 experts in 80 nations, discovered creatures such as a hairy-clawed "yeti crab", luminous fish in the sunless depths, a shrimp thought extinct in Jurassic times and a 7-metre (23 ft) long squid. (Photo: geo.sina.com.cn/ Kevin Raskoff, Monterey Peninsula College)

Scientists completed a 10-year census of marine life on October 4, 2010, after finding thousands of exotic new species in a project that will help assess threats to the oceans ranging from climate change to BP's oil spill. The $650 million international census, by 2,700 experts in 80 nations, discovered creatures such as a hairy-clawed "yeti crab", luminous fish in the sunless depths, a shrimp thought extinct in Jurassic times and a 7-metre (23 ft) long squid. (Photo: geo.sina.com.cn/ Carlos Moura, CENSAM/Universidade de Aveiro)

A new copepod, Ceratonotus steiningeri, which was first discovered 5,400 meters deep in the Angola Basin in 2006, is seen in this undated handout. Scientists completed a 10-year census of marine life on October 4, 2010, after finding thousands of exotic new species in a project that will help assess threats to the oceans ranging from climate change to BP's oil spill. The $650 million international census, by 2,700 experts in 80 nations, discovered creatures such as a hairy-clawed "yeti crab", luminous fish in the sunless depths, a shrimp thought extinct in Jurassic times and a 7-metre (23 ft) long squid. (Photo: geo.sina.com.cn/Jan Michels)

Scientists completed a 10-year census of marine life on October 4, 2010, after finding thousands of exotic new species in a project that will help assess threats to the oceans ranging from climate change to BP's oil spill. The $650 million international census, by 2,700 experts in 80 nations, discovered creatures such as a hairy-clawed "yeti crab", luminous fish in the sunless depths, a shrimp thought extinct in Jurassic times and a 7-metre (23 ft) long squid.

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