Tue, December 22, 2009
World > Americas > UN Climate Change Conference 2009

Brazil to continue efforts on combating global warming: environment minister

2009-12-22 01:53:47 GMT2009-12-22 09:53:47 (Beijing Time)  Xinhua English

RIO DE JANEIRO, Dec. 21 (Xinhua) -- Brazil's Environment Minister Carlos Minc said on Monday that his country will keep on working to minimize the effects of global warming and demanding more aggressive stances of rich countries on the issue.

Stressing that Brazil's participation in the UN Climate Change Conference last week in Copenhagen was much praised, Minc said "It is not because selfishness and folly prevailed there that we will not do our homework. We will keep on working."

Among the measures to be taken by the Brazilian government is the implementation of the Savanna Fund, an initiative to protect the country's savanna ecosystem, said the minister, without elaborating on the details of the fund.

Additionally, Brazil will increase cooperation with neighboring countries in order to protect the Amazon rainforest, and also help African countries fight desertification, he said.

Earlier in the day, Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva criticized the United States for doing too little for the planet, and reminded that developed countries are the greatest polluters in the world.

Lula urged all countries to work together in order to reach an agreement that allows real progress in minimizing the effects of climate change, expressing his hope that such an agreement may be reached in the next climate conference to be held in Mexico in 2010.

RIO DE JANEIRO, Dec. 21 (Xinhua) -- Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva on Monday criticized Washington's weak performance at the UN climate change conference in Copenhagen.

The United States is not doing much for the planet, Lula commented in his weekly radio program.

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