Thu, September 13, 2012
World > Asia-Pacific

Japan's former DM suggests JSDF to become national defense forces

2012-09-13 05:59:19 GMT2012-09-13 13:59:19(Beijing Time)  SINA English

Former Defense Minister Shigeru Ishiba declared his candidacy for the upcoming Liberal Democratic Party presidential race on Monday. He said Japan should turn Self-Defense Forces into "national defense forces", and exercise the right of collective self-defense.

By International Law, Japan has the right of collective self-defense, that is, the right to use armed strength to stop armed attack on a foreign country with which it has close relations, although Japan is not under direct attack.

However, Japan is not permissible to use the right since it exceeds the limit of use of armed strength as permitted under its Constitution. It is written in Japan's pacifist constitution that Japan is only allowed to possess and maintain the minimum level of armed strength for self-defense.

Therefore, Shigeru Ishiba's idea of turning the defensive self-defense forces into offensive "national defense forces" is totally unconstitutional, and also poses a blatant challenge to International Law, and more specifically, a contempt to the victory of the world's anti-fascist war.

The Japan Self-Defense Forces exist in name only. In fact , Japan Self-Defense Forces basically amount to national defense forces in build-up and equipment; and specially its navy and air force keep offensive capabilities, commented Yin Zhuo, a military expert.

"The JSDF is no longer the force with a minimum level of armed strength for self-defence that its ally U.S. specified 50 years ago. The equipment and technology of JSDF could be comparable to the U.S.'s ." Yin added.

Related news:

Japanese PM orders Self-Defense Forces fully prepared for emergency

Japan's PM: Mobilize SDF for Diaoyus if necessary

Japan GSDF holds first live-fire drill to protect island

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