Fri, September 14, 2012
World

Russia blames sanctions for Syrian people's misery

2012-09-14 13:51:04 GMT2012-09-14 21:51:04(Beijing Time)  Xinhua English

MOSCOW, Sept. 14 (Xinhua) -- The humanitarian situation in Syria was deteriorating due to sanctions against Damascus, Russia's Foreign Ministry said Friday.

Criticizing "economic sanctions and restrictions imposed by some countries and regional unions", it said in a statement: "We have repeatedly pointed out the fallaciousness of such a practice."

Earlier, the World Health Organization, U.N. Children's Fund (UNICEF) and the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UNOCHA) had notified Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov of the dire humanitarian situation in Syria, highlighting the growing number of civilian casualties, displaced persons and refugees.

Russia agreed with these assessments and believed the Syrian authorities were cooperating with the International Red Cross and undertaking other measures to help the victims of the domestic conflict.

"We proceed from belief that radical healing of the complicated humanitarian situation in Syria is possible only through a political settlement in that country. Russia keeps making intensive efforts on all levels for an immediate end to violence by all sides and the start of a wide national dialogue," the statement said.

Russia has provided 4.5 million U.S. dollars to the UN Food Program, 1.5 million dollars to UNOCHA and 2 million Swiss francs to the International Red Cross for their humanitarian work in Syria.

"Russia has delivered 80 tons of humanitarian aid to Damascus in the last few months," the Ministry said, adding a new consignment had been prepared.

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