Sun, May 09, 2010
World > Asia-Pacific

7.2-magnitude earthquake hits Indonesia's Aceh

2010-05-09 08:20:35 GMT2010-05-09 16:20:35 (Beijing Time)  Xinhua English

Residents in Aceh stand outside after a 7.2-magnitude quake hit the province on May 9, 2010. The quake struck southwest of Meulaboh district and triggered a local tsunami alert, according to the local Meteorological and Geophysics agency. (AFP Photo)

Residents in Aceh stand outside after a 7.2-magnitude quake hit the province on May 9, 2010. The quake struck southwest of Meulaboh district and triggered a local tsunami alert, according to the local Meteorological and Geophysics agency. (AFP Photo)

JAKARTA, May 9 (Xinhua) -- A major earthquake measuring 7.2 on the Richter scale hit Indonesian westernmost of Aceh province on Sunday at 12:59 local time (0559 GMT), the Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics Agency (BMKG) said in a statement.

The epicenter was at 66 km of southwestern town of Meulaboh and at depth of 30 km under seabed.

The tremor was felt about 30-40 seconds. The agency issued a tsunami warning.

Currently, the agency revoked the tsunami alert.

MetroTV television reported that people's activities were back to normal. It said,"there is not anticipative action by police as activities are back to normal."

Ali Muzayin, the agency's head of Seismology Division said that as 30 minutes passed after the earthquake, the tsunami potential lessened.

Fauzai, the agency's Head of Earthquake Center, said, "the tsunami has no potential to go onshore".

Muhammad Nazar, the Vice Governor of Aceh and the Head of Disaster Coordination Task Force, said that buildings were heavily damaged in Aceh Barat regency, Simeulue Island and other coastal areas.

He also said that power was shutdown in several areas due to the major earthquake.

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