Mon, November 08, 2010
World > Americas > US midterm election 2010

U.S. voters choose new Congress, governors

2010-11-02 13:41:47 GMT2010-11-02 21:41:47 (Beijing Time)  Xinhua English

People wait to cast their votes at a polling station in Arlington, Virginia, the United States, Nov. 2, 2010, the U.S. Midterm Election Day. (Xinhua/Zhang Jun)

A man distributes leaflets at a polling station in Arlington, Virginia, the United States, Nov. 2, 2010, the U.S. Midterm Election Day. (Xinhua/Zhang Jun)

People fill in their ballots at a polling station in Manhattan of New York, the United States, Nov. 2, 2010, the U.S. Midterm Election Day. (Xinhua/Shen Hong)

People fill in their ballots at a polling station in Manhattan of New York, the United States, Nov. 2, 2010, the U.S. Midterm Election Day. (Xinhua/Shen Hong)

WASHINGTON, Nov. 2 (Xinhua) -- U.S. voters on Tuesday head to polling stations from Atlantic East to Pacific West to choose a new Congress and governors for 37 states, in elections which opinion polls said could see Republicans retake the House of Representatives.

Across the country, many polling stations open between 6 a.m. and 9 a.m., and close between 6 p.m. and 9 p.m. Voters are choosing all 435 members of the House of Representatives, 37 of the 100-member Senate, 37 governors and two heads of U.S. territories.

In Arlington, Virginia, just outside Washington D.C., polling stations opened their doors at 6 a.m., and voters slowly trickled in.

Toni Stephens, a Republican campaign worker stationed outside the Rosslyn precinct polling station, said the day started slow, but she was optimistic the turnout will pick up later in the day.

Steve Baker, the Democratic precinct captain who has been greeting voters outside the polling station, held a similar view, but noted Mid-term Elections traditionally have lower turnout. He also noted Virginia is not holding a Senate or governor election, and that could mean lower turnout.

However, by 8 a.m., a long line of voters has formed at the nearby Wilson precinct polling station, signaling voters may be more enthused in a year which could see the House change hands.

The elections are framed as a referendum on policies of President Barack Obama and the Democratic Party, which controls both the Senate and the House.

Pre-election polling results showed nearly half of likely voters say they'll vote for Republicans to protest against the Democrats, reflecting their frustration with Obama and the Democratic-run Congress.

Riding the wave of voters' anger, Republicans are poised to retake the House. They have to gain 39 seats to become majority party in the House, an outcome deemed highly possible by predictions.

The Senate is another story. Republicans have to gain 10 seats to become the majority. Predictions say Democrats may cling to a slim majority.

Add Your Comments:

Your Name:
Your Country:
Comment:
(English Only)
 
Please read our Terms of Service. Messages that harass, abuse or threaten others; have obscene or otherwise objectionable content; have spam, commercial or advertising content or links may be removed.

SPECIAL COVERAGE

MOST VIEWED

LATEST VIDEO

PICTURE GALLERY