Sat, December 24, 2011
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Obama urges lawmakers to pass full-year tax cut, jobless benefits

2011-12-23 19:13:13 GMT2011-12-24 03:13:13(Beijing Time)  Xinhua English

U.S. President Barack Obama delivers a speech after signing the payroll tax bill at the White House in Washington D.C., capital of the United States, Dec. 23, 2011. U.S. President Barack Obama on Friday signed the bipartisan short-term compromise stopgap measure to extend the payroll tax cut and federal jobless benefits into law, and urged lawmakers to negotiate next year and extend the tax cut and benefits for a full year. (Xinhua/Zhang Jun)

U.S. President Barack Obama is about to deliver a speech after signing the payroll tax bill at the White House in Washington D.C., capital of the United States, Dec. 23, 2011. U.S. President Barack Obama on Friday signed the bipartisan short-term compromise stopgap measure to extend the payroll tax cut and federal jobless benefits into law, and urged lawmakers to negotiate next year and extend the tax cut and benefits for a full year. (Xinhua/Zhang Jun)

U.S. President Barack Obama shakes hands with journalists while leaving for Hawaii after signing the payroll tax bill at the White House in Washington D.C., capital of the United States, Dec. 23, 2011. U.S. President Barack Obama on Friday signed the bipartisan short-term compromise stopgap measure to extend the payroll tax cut and federal jobless benefits into law, and urged lawmakers to negotiate next year and extend the tax cut and benefits for a full year. (Xinhua/Zhang Jun)

WASHINGTON, Dec. 23 (Xinhua) -- U.S. President Barack Obama on Friday signed the bipartisan short-term compromise stopgap measure to extend the payroll tax cut and federal jobless benefits into law, and urged lawmakers to negotiate next year and extend the tax cut and benefits for a full year.

In a hastily arranged White House press conference before his departure to Hawaii to join his family for holiday, Obama, a Democrat, hailed the hard-won compromise achieved after a wild week on Capitol Hill as House Republicans urged their leaders to stage a new round of partisan fight with Democrats.

The two chambers of U.S. Congress on Friday passed a two-month payroll tax and jobless benefits bill, after the compromise finally took shape on Thursday.

The bill capped a week-long partisan deadlock, and would boost the paycheck of the average American family with an annual income of 50,000 U.S. dollars by about 20 dollars a week and prevent almost 2 million long-term unemployed people from losing jobless benefits averaging about 300 dollars per week.

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