Tue, July 12, 2011
Technology > Science

Colorful creatures of the Philippines

2011-07-12 09:33:39 GMT2011-07-12 17:33:39(Beijing Time)  SINA.com

These swell sharks can make like giants by inflating their bellies with water. View more images on LiveScience.com. (Photo credit: Stephanie Stone, California Academy of Sciences)

A new species of swell shark from the deep sea. To scare off predators, this shark can inflate its stomach with water to bulk up. View more images on LiveScience.com. (Photo credit: Stephanie Stone, California Academy of Sciences)

A new species of Nembrotha nudibranch (also known as a sea slug) that was discovered during the California Academy of Sciences' 2011 Philippine Biodiversity Expedition. View more images on LiveScience.com. (Photo credit: Terry Gosliner, California Academy of Sciences)

A new species of Phyllidia nudibranch (also known as a sea slug) that was discovered during the California Academy of Sciences' 2011 Philippine Biodiversity Expedition. View more images on LiveScience.com. (Photo credit: Terry Gosliner, California Academy of Sciences)

These swell sharks can make like giants by inflating their bellies with water. View more images on LiveScience.com. (Photo credit: Stephanie Stone, California Academy of Sciences) A new species of swell shark from the deep sea. To scare off predators, this shark can inflate its stomach with water to bulk up. View more images on LiveScience.com. (Photo credit: Stephanie Stone, California Academy of Sciences) A new species of Nembrotha nudibranch (also known as a sea slug) that was discovered during the California Academy of Sciences' 2011 Philippine Biodiversity Expedition. View more images on LiveScience.com. (Photo credit: Terry Gosliner, California Academy of Sciences) A new species of Phyllidia nudibranch (also known as a sea slug) that was discovered during the California Academy of Sciences' 2011 Philippine Biodiversity Expedition. View more images on LiveScience.com. (Photo credit: Terry Gosliner, California Academy of Sciences) A likely new species of Petalomera crab from the deep sea, discovered during a 2011 expedition to the Philippines. View more images on LiveScience.com. (Photo credit: California Academy of Sciences)

This colorful worm is likely a new species of the genus Myrianida, which was found in coral rubble in the Philippines. View more images on LiveScience.com. (Photo credit: Chrissy Piotrowski, California Academy of Sciences)

A treasure trove of hundreds of new species may have been discovered in the Philippines, including a bizarre sea star that feeds exclusively on sunken driftwood and a deep-sea, shrimp-eating shark that swells up to scare off other predators.

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